Clean Currents 2022

Pumped Storage Technical Advances

Presentations are:

Bad Creek Modernization and Uprate Case Study, presented by Mark Rizzo, Duke Energy

Enhanced Flexibility Technologies in Pumped-Storage Hydropower Plants: The XFLEX HYDRO Demonstrations, presented by Monica Suarez, EPFL- Technology Platform for Hydraulic Machines

Advances in Reservoir Linings for Pumped Storage Projects, presented by Scott DeNeale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy

Technology Innovations for Pumped Storage Hydropower, presented by Vladimir Koritarov, Argonne National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy

Details about each presentation and the speakers are below.

Bad Creek Modernization and Uprate Case Study, presented by Mark Rizzo, Duke Energy
Bad Creek Station was originally commissioned in 1991 and has represented a significant contribution to low-cost energy storage and release for the company’s portfolio. This resource has benefited the customers of Duke Energy for nearly three decades.

Bad Creek Hydro Project is a 1,360-MW pumped-storage facility with 4 Francis turbine units. Duke Energy has upgraded 2 of the 4 units and is in the process of completing the third unit. The upgrade has increased the capacity of each unit by 80 MW.

New innovations in pump-turbine and motor-generator designs have created opportunities to achieve significant improvements in reliability and efficiency.

Enhanced Flexibility Technologies in Pumped-Storage Hydropower Plants: The XFLEX HYDRO Demonstrations, presented by Monica Suarez, EPFL- Technology Platform for Hydraulic Machines

XFLEX HYDRO is an ambitious energy innovation project demonstrating how flexible hydropower technologies can deliver a low-carbon, secure, and resilient power system. In particular, XFLEX HYDRO demonstrates new hydropower technologies such as smart controls, enhanced variable- and fixed-speed turbine systems, as well as a battery-turbine hybrid.

Four pumped-storage hydropower plants (PSPs) have been studied to enhance their flexibility by targeting the optimal implementation and use of variable speed technology and/or hydraulic short circuit operation.

Variable speed technology is well known to allow compensating large head variation by keeping a good efficiency; in this project, the benefits of this technology have also been extended to the transient regimes where optimal start-up sequences have been implemented to minimize losses and damage.

Hydraulic short circuit (i.e., simultaneous operation of pump and turbine in the same PSP) allows regulating the pumping power; the XFLEX HYDRO project has investigated how to achieve an optimal power dispatch and use of this operating mode to improve the provision of balancing power.

Advances in Reservoir Linings for Pumped Storage Projects, presented by Scott DeNeale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy

DOE’s Water Power Technologies Office has funded a scoping study performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Stantec to research the use of reservoir lining systems for pumped-storage hydropower (PSH) applications.

During construction, PSH reservoirs are equipped with a seepage barrier to retain water. Traditionally these seepage barriers have been comprised of cores of impervious soil, or upstream linings constructed on the face of the embankments made from dense asphalt concrete or reinforced concrete slabs.

A more recent development is the use of geomembrane lining systems for the upstream lining of PSH reservoirs. The study consisted of a literature review for pertinent and publicly available information concerning geomembrane lining materials and their use in dams, reservoirs, and PSH, and an assessment of the applicability of geomembrane lining systems to PSH reservoirs.

Technology Innovations for Pumped Storage Hydropower, presented by Vladimir Koritarov, Argonne National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy

A review of technology innovations for pumped storage hydropower (PSH) was the focus of recent study carried out by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Water Power Technologies Office. The study covered the current state of PSH technologies, the latest trends in PSH plant design and configurations, and provided an objective assessment of proposed new PSH concepts and technology innovations.

As part of this study, a detailed review of 12 innovative PSH technologies was performed using a set of predefined evaluation criteria. Because the innovative PSH technologies are at different technology readiness levels, the study did not attempt to rank or directly compare technologies to each other.

In addition to innovative PSH concepts, the study also discussed potential ways to add PSH capabilities to existing hydropower plants, as well as the innovative new excavation and dam construction technologies that could potentially accelerate the development and deployment of new PSH projects.

Presenter Information

Don Erpenbeck

Don Erpenbeck
Vice President & Global Sector Leader- Dams & Hydropower, Energy Business Line
Stantec
Moderator


Mark Rizzo

Mark Rizzo
Project Engineer, Hydro West Regional Services, Regulated Renewables
Duke Energy Corporation
Presenter


Monica Suarez

Monica Suarez
Head, Model Testing Group
EPFL- Technology Platform for Hydraulic Machines
Presenter


Scott DeNeale

Scott DeNeale
Water Resources Engineer, Environmental Sciences Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), U.S. Department of Energy
Presenter


Vladimir Koritarov

Vladimir Koritarov
Director, Center for Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis; Program Manager, Water Power Program
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), U.S. Department of Energy
Presenter