Clean Currents 2022

Modernization – Solutions for Aging Infrastructure

Presentations are:

Managing Concrete Infrastructure: How Integrated Delivery Drives Value, presented by Thomas Kline, Structural Technologies

Fleet Overhaul Planning Program at Orillia Power, presented by Stefan Kohnen, KGS Group

Rehabilitation and Repair of Spillway Radial Gates, presented by Matthew Hess, McMillen Jacobs Associates

Details about each presentation and the speakers are below.

Managing Concrete Infrastructure: How Integrated Delivery Drives Value, presented by Thomas Kline, Structural Technologies
Concrete is the leading construction material found at dams and powerhouses in the US. Beyond the primary structures that make up hydroelectric stations, critical mechanical equipment is also supported by concrete of some type, whether structural members or discrete support, such as pedestals. It is everywhere, and how concrete infrastructure is managed has a direct impact on safety, production, revenue, and profit.

As concrete ages it deteriorates, and this process can speed up if corrosion of the steel reinforcement starts to occur. What does proactive management of concrete infrastructure look like?
-periodically investigating existing conditions
-tracking investigation results (learning about the behavior of your concrete over time)
-analysis of investigation results
-identification and prioritizing of repair needs
-developing and designing repair solutions
-implementation of repairs

Integrated delivery to support this proactive approach is called Investigate-Design-Build (IDB) – it combines the investigation function with design-build of repair solutions. IDB creates continuity in asset management of concrete infrastructure by creating a single source to support and deliver all phases. This improves asset management programs with less time needed for plant personnel to support ongoing efforts, shorter cycles between investigation and repair, lower total long-term cost of ownership, and increased safety and quality.

Aging and deteriorated concrete in hydroelectric stations creates major challenges for critical revenue-generating processes. Investigating and repairing concrete can be extremely difficult with access issues and schedule constraints. This presentation will provide an update on the state-of-the-art for managing concrete infrastructure including “outside-the-box” examples of best practices and lessons learned from other sectors including nuclear and industrial facilities facing similar challenges. Attendees will learn about effective concrete asset management program components including investigation techniques, innovative rapid-setting repair materials, repair methods tailored for return-to-service in harsh and aggressive environments, and case-study examples of how the IDB approach delivers value.

Fleet Overhaul Planning Program at Orillia Power, presented by Stefan Kohnen, KGS Group
Orillia Power has traditionally refurbished units approximately every 10 to 15 years but had no mechanism for assessing or identifying if this frequency is either adequate or excessive, nor if this frequency should be dependent upon other indicators.

Orillia Power requested KGS Group to develop a program (or “guideline”) which establishes requirements/deficiencies for the need of a unit refurbishment. The objective was to use this guideline and confirm that the existing units at Orillia Power require refurbishment and provide a link to demonstrable industry practices to substantiate the investment decisions.

The presentation will address:

1) Explain the business reasons that drove the development of the program.
2) Describe the concepts elaborated by Orillia Power to suit their operations.
3) Describe the program that was developed jointly by Orillia Power and KGS Group.
4) Describe how it would be used by Orillia Power staff in the overhaul decision making process.

Rehabilitation and Repair of Spillway Radial Gates, presented by Matthew Hess, McMillen Jacobs Associates
Radial gates are one of the most common types of spillway gates in use due to their efficient use of structural materials, the mechanical advantage of their hoist equipment, and their ideal hydraulic characteristics. As the nation’s spillway gate infrastructure ages problems with radial gates that are approaching or past their intended service life have become more common.

After the 1995 Folsom spillway gate 3 failure there was increased awareness of the condition of radial gates among dam owners. Since that point detailed inspections performed by various dam owners have resulted in findings on radial gates which include incipient buckling of strut arms, seized trunnions, structural cracking, imbalanced rope tensions, and various other mechanical and electrical reliability issues. Some dam owners have taken steps to rehabilitate or repair their spillway radial gates with the goal of resetting the service life.
This presentation has been created to help inform dam owners on radial gate rehabilitation work that has been performed to date and the key lessons learned from these past rehabilitations. It will cover current inspection guidance, design criteria, considerations for rehabilitation vs. replacement, failure modes to considers, and typical budgets and schedules for previous construction efforts.

Presenter Information

Celeste Fay

Celeste Fay
Director of Regulatory Affairs
Gravity Renewables
Emcee


Thomas Kline

Thomas Kline
Senior Director, Concrete Repair Solutions
Structural Technologies
Presenter


Stefan Kohnen

Stefan Kohnen
Regional Manager
KGS Group
Presenter


Matthew Hess

Matthew Hess
Managing Mechanical Engineer
McMillen Jacobs Associates
Presenter